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Cisco still rules global revenue roost for CMTS, Moto gains on Arris

Thu, 08/25/2011 - 8:25am
Mike Robuck

Cisco is still the worldwide leader when it comes to global revenues for cable modem termination systems (CMTSs), but Motorola's share jumped 6 percent at the expense of second-ranked Arris.

Infonetics Research released the market data in a new report, which also included edge QAMs. Overall, worldwide CMTS and edge QAM revenue together grew 12 percent to $464 million in the most recent second quarter on the heels of a 13 percent increase in the first quarter of this year.

CMTS Revenue Share-Q2-2011

Infonetics said CMTS revenue in the second quarter of this year actually declined in North America as cable operators throttled back on their purchases, but worldwide demand offset that decline.

"The second quarter saw another 18 percent increase in CMTS downstreams, driven largely by growth outside North America, particularly Latin America. The lower cost of new CMTS linecards coupled with a steady rise in consumer demand for bandwidth continues to drive these purchases. Edge QAM revenue is up, as well, driven by continued growth in QAM channels used in DOCSIS/M-CMTS, video-on-demand and switched digital video applications," said Jeff Heynen, directing analyst for broadband access at Infonetics Research.

As for edge QAMs, Infonetics expects global edge QAM revenue to increase 6 percent in 2011 and to become a larger portion of the cable equipment market as more operators move to CCAP (Converged Cable Access Platform) architectures.

On the subscriber front, Infonetics forecast that the number of cable broadband subscribers would grow from 108 million worldwide in 2010 to 125 million in 2015.

In addition to Cisco, Arris and Motorola, the report also tracks BigBand Networks, Casa Systems, CommScope, Ericsson, Harmonic, Sumavision, Teleste and Vecima.

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