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Marv Nelson, a long-time fixture of the Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers, is leaving the organization at the end of this month.

Nelson, who began working with the Society nearly 20 years ago, will continue to lend his expertise as a consultant.

Most recently, Nelson served as senior vice president of strategic initiatives, working with industry organizations, the international community and other organizations to expand the scope of SCTE's activities.

He was instrumental in the restructuring of the SCTE board of directors earlier this year, the organization said, as well as the creation of the recently completed SCTE Leadership Institute with the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College.

"Over the past several years," Nelson said, "I've had specific goals that have involved transitioning SCTE to new leadership, a new board structure, and the expansion of SCTE member resources beyond training and certification, as well as other new areas of focus. As that process came to an end, I gave increasingly greater consideration to taking on new challenges, particularly in entirely different segments of the non-profit sector."

Nelson joined SCTE in 1991 as director of chapter development and became director of certification programs two years later. From 1996-2009, he was vice president of professional development, with responsibility for building SCTE's training and certification business, directing all technical education programs and developing the organization's training resources. During that period, Nelson also served twice as interim president and CEO.

"Marv Nelson has been involved in every aspect of SCTE's growth and change for the past two decades," said Mark Dzuban, president and CEO of SCTE. "The dedication, commitment and insights that he has brought to our organization have been responsible for many of the programs that have become synonymous with SCTE. We're tremendously grateful for his efforts in the past and for his continued support and care for the organization in the future."

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