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Study: Cable represents 1.8M jobs – and growing

Wed, 03/09/2011 - 7:30am
Brian Santo

The U.S. cable industry supports nearly 1.8 million jobs, representing gross economic output amounting to more than $251 billion, according to a study released by the NCTA.

The industry has continued to grow in recent years despite the national economic downturn, according to the study, conducted by Bortz Media and Sports Group.

"The cable industry makes a substantial contribution to the national economy, including local economies in every state and thousands of communities nationwide," said Kyle McSlarrow, president and CEO of the NCTA. "Even during the recent economic downturn, the cable industry continued to create new jobs in both distribution and content and to invest in infrastructure, bringing faster broadband, innovative video services and competitive phone service to millions of consumers."

The study revealed that:

  • The cable industry directly employs 233,700 people in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Personal income to cable industry employees totals $17.3 billion.
  • Cable industry suppliers provide another 136,000 cable-related jobs, representing personal income of $11.1 billion.
  • Since 2002, direct and indirect employment attributable to the cable industry has increased by 638,000 jobs. The industry added 4,700 jobs over the last three years at a time when the U.S. economy's net loss of jobs was more than 7 million.

The report calculates that the industry has invested more than $170 billion in infrastructure over the last decade and a half.

"Through its aggressive reinvestment of capital and its efforts to deploy new and innovative services to consumers, the industry has fostered the development of a highly competitive telecommunications market and has been a catalyst for broadband growth in the U.S.," the report states. "Through these investment and innovation initiatives, the industry has exerted a substantial impact on the United States economy."

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