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Research: Consumers prefer Internet over cell phones, cable

Wed, 06/17/2009 - 8:25am
Mike Robuck

According to research from the Pew Internet & American Life Project, consumers favor the Internet over their cell phone and cable TV services.

The research, which will be presented today in Washington, D.C., at the Internet Innovation Alliance's Symposium "Developing a National Broadband Strategy: Deployment, Adoption and the Stimulus,” also said that home broadband adoption rates were up 15 percent this year.

Featured speakers at the event include John Horrigan, associate director of the Pew Internet Project, who will discuss the findings of Pew's new report, "Home Broadband Adoption 2009."

"We found that broadband is now in the 'must keep' category for Americans, even when economic times are tough," said Horrigan, the principal author of the report. "Many consumers view their home broadband connection as a conduit for connecting to community and economic opportunities."

The researched showed that 63 percent of adult Americans surveyed now have broadband Internet connections in their homes despite the current economic recession. The growth in broadband adoption seems to show that the recession has had little effect on decisions about whether to buy or keep a home high-speed Internet connection.

The survey found that people are twice as likely to say they have cut back or cancelled a cell phone plan or cable TV service instead of their Internet service:

  • 9 percent of Internet users say that in the past 12 months, they have cancelled or cut back online service.
  • 22 percent of adults say they have cancelled or cut back cable TV service in the past 12 months.
  • 22 percent of cell phone users report that in the past 12 months, they have cancelled or cut back cell phone service.

Broadband users were also asked, for the first time in a Pew survey, how they viewed the importance of broadband to civic and community life. Roughly 55 percent of home broadband users said broadband was very important to at least one dimension of their lives and community, such as communicating with health care providers, government officials, sharing information about the community or contributing to economic growth.

More Broadband Direct 06/17/09:
•  Comcast gears up for digital upgrades in New Jersey
•  Genachowski sailing through nomination process
•  Comcast shows IPv6 readiness at conference
•  U.S. Trustee objects to Charter bankruptcy plan
•  DirecTV draws a bead on targeted advertising
•  Rentrak, Concurrent join forces on three-screen video analytics
•  Comcast's new debt given investment grade rating
•  IPTV growing; broadband too
•  Research: Consumers prefer Internet over cell phones, cable 
•  Reception problems linger after DTV transition
•  Startup taps Alvarion for its rural WiMAX network
•  Adobe Systems posts drop in Q2 profit, sales
•  Attempted Iran media clampdown meets Internet age
•  Broadband Briefs for 06/17/09

 

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