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Rogers founder Ted Rogers passes

Tue, 12/02/2008 - 7:55am
Mike Robuck

The board of directors for Rogers Communications said today that founder and CEO Ted Rogers had passed away.

In November, Rogers, 75, was admitted to a hospital for an existing cardiac condition, and today’s press release said he suffered from a congestive heart failure condition that had weakened his health over the past few years.

Ted Rogers
Rogers

"We wish to express our deepest sympathy to Loretta and all of the Rogers family for this loss," said Alan Horn, chairman of Rogers Communications and acting CEO. "Ted Rogers was one of a kind who built this company from one FM radio station into Canada's largest wireless, cable and media company. A leader also in giving to the community through his and (wife) Loretta's many philanthropic initiatives. He will be sadly missed."

Horn was named acting CEO when Ted Rogers was admitted to the hospital in November. Rogers' successor as CEO will be addressed by the Rogers Communications board of directors, which intends to form a special committee to lead a search considering internal and external candidates.

In the meantime, Horn will continue to serve as acting CEO and lead the company's office of the president.

Rogers built Rogers Communications into a Canadian and North American leader in wireless telecommunications, cable television, broadcasting, publishing and more.

The cable industry owes Ted Rogers an enormous debt of gratitude," said CableLabs President and CEO Richard Green. "His love for technology and its development contributed in many ways to the success that the industry has achieved. Ted pioneered many of the new technologies that brought leadership and distinction to cable. Rogers was the first company to offer cable modem service and initiate the transition from entertainment to telecommunication services. We are proud that Ted was a member and an integral part of the CableLabs governance for twenty years. We all mourn his passing. We will miss him. We have lost a special person and a great telecommunication pioneer and entrepreneur.

"The entire U.S. cable industry today mourns the loss of our friend, Ted Rogers, a great leader and visionary in cable telecommunications whose impact is felt well beyond his beloved Canada,” said NCTA President and CEO Kyle McSlarrow. “Ted was a true pathfinder in the telecommunications industry, from his modest beginnings in radio to the unprecedented innovation he brought to cable television, high-speed Internet and wireless telephone services. Ted shared his pioneering vision with this industry for more than 40 years, as a provider of services in both the United States and in Canada, and through his longtime service as a member of the CableLabs board of directors. We will truly miss his passionate leadership."

"Our sincerest condolences to Loretta, the children and the grandchildren,” said Phil Lind, Rogers’ vice chairman, who worked alongside Rogers for almost 40 years. “He will be missed by so many. Though Ted was relentless in business and building this company over the years, he was also very much a family man. His impact on family, community and country was as impressive as his business success.”

Ted Rogers’ son, Edward Rogers, 38, is currently the head of Rogers Cable.

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