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Verizon touts results of 100 Gbps trial

Mon, 10/06/2008 - 8:10am
Mike Robuck

Verizon said its latest trial of 100-gigabyte optical transmission technology performed with better tolerance for signal distortion than what is typically found in today’s standard wavelength of 10 gigabytes.

Transporting data over 73 kilometers of field fiber in northeastern Texas at a 92 Gbps (gigabits per second) rate, the recent trial demonstrated twice the tolerance for signal distortion when compared with today's standard 10G signal.

According to Verizon, the Nortel Optical Multiservice Edge 6500 convergence platform – equipped with 40G/100G Adaptive Optical Engine technology – integrates advanced signal-processing techniques that maintain sustained signal integrity despite significant polarization mode dispersion (PMD). PMD, a natural impairment of optical fiber transmission, causes a signal to distort as it travels along the optical fiber, which results in imperfections when the signal arrives at the receiver end and limits the amount of data that can be transmitted.

"This latest trial further illustrates Verizon's keen interest in viable 100G technologies," said Mark Wegleitner, Verizon's senior vice president of technology. "Each advance we make moves the Verizon network closer to commercial deployment of reliable higher-bandwidth speeds on the backbone to serve our customers' needs – whether it's voice, video or data."

On Sept. 25, Verizon and Nokia Siemens Networks announced that they had successfully transmitted data at 100G on a single wavelength for more than 1,040 kilometers, setting a new distance record over deployed fiber and demonstrating better performance than conventional transmission (story here).

Last year, Verizon and Alcatel-Lucent transmitted a commercial information package – a FiOS video stream – between Tampa, Fla., and Miami at 100G for the first time over a live network (story here).

In the Nortel trial, Verizon said it transmitted the 100G traffic error-free using an advanced signal-processing method and signal-correcting techniques embedded in Nortel's technology.

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• Broadband Briefs for 10/06/08

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