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Arista Networks aims at Cisco’s sweet spot

Thu, 10/23/2008 - 8:40am
Brian Santo

Arista Networks, a 4-year-old start-up established by a highly respected founder of Sun Microsystems, is preparing to enter the switching systems market, going head to head with the likes of Cisco Systems and Juniper Networks.

Andreas von Bechtolsheim
Andreas von Bechtolsheim

A notable first customer is BitGravity, a video distribution company. Others include Lawrence Livermore Labs and Northwestern University, both known for high-speed computing research.

The company specializes in what it calls “cloud networking,” named after the cloud that on most graphic representations of a network depicts the public Internet. The company’s technology depends on the use of powerful chips and innovative software to perform switching faster than rival systems, at one-tenth of the cost, according to an article on the company in The New York Times (story here).

The founder of the company is Andreas von Bechtolsheim, who has a reputation as one of Silicon Valley’s most innovative scientists. His partner is David R. Cheriton, a professor from Stanford University who specializes in leading edge software.

The company has also recruited Jayshree Ullal, who had been a prominent executive at Cisco, to run the company.

More Broadband Direct:

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• AT&T completes transition to 40G backbone 

• Arista Networks aims at Cisco's sweet spot 

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• Infonetics: 10G market to hit $9.5 billion in 2008 

• Broadband Briefs for 10/23/08 

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