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ARRIS to lead European venture to achieve 1 Gbps data rates

Thu, 05/25/2006 - 7:09am
Brian Santo, CED

ARRIS has established a partnership with a pan-European group of companies to research the technology required to accelerate the deployment of very high-speed broadband access over HFC networks in the region.

ARRIS' European R&D Centre, Communications Ireland, is a developer of Euro-DOCSIS CMTS equipment, and has been a strong contributor to Euro-DOCSIS initiatives. Its facility in Cork, Ireland, is responsible for the Cadant C3 CMTS and Keystone D5 DMTS products.

The project is called Core Subsystem for Delivery of Multiband Data in CATV Networks which, if looked at sort of sideways, can be abbreviated into the euphonious CODMUCA.

Members are: Liberty Global Europe Technology B.V. (Netherlands); Coditel S.P.R.L. (Belgium); Coditel S.A.R.L. (Luxembourg); EST Videocommunication S.A.S. (France); VECTOR sp.z o.o (Poland); Cork Institute of Technology (Ireland); Politechnika Warszawska (Warsaw University of Technology, Poland); and ARRIS Communications (Ireland).

The CODMUCA program is aimed at accelerating the development and deployment of technology needed to progress from equipment based on the current Euro-DOCSIS 2.0 specs, which provide data transmission rates up to 40 Mbps, to systems based on Euro-DOCSIS 3.0, conceived to deliver data at up to 1 Gbps. 

A key element of Euro-DOCSIS 3.0 is the ability to form unified multiband data channels to the subscriber. A key requirement for the new technology is to ensure backward compatibility and co-existence with the existing single 8 MHz channel Euro-DOCSIS 1.1 and 2.0 systems (in North America, channels are in increments of 6 MHz).

The project embodies one of the European Commission's FP6 core objectives of providing broadband for all, and will enable high-speed data service over HFC at a cost point that will make it available to systems operating in peripheral regions and small to medium markets.

Use of the Multiband technology as transport "pipes" to remote wireless base stations and access points will help to bridge the "digital divide" between urban dwellers and those living in the outlying areas.

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